The Unmapped Sea

Note: I wrote this review in 2015, and am just now publishing it.

Joy abounds! The latest adventure in The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place is here! I have devoured the book. Now I am anxiously awaiting our family vacation so we can devour the audio book.

As with the other books in the series, Maryrose Wood delights readers with irreverent wanderings of the narrator, strange and ironic plot twists, and dramatic characters. (See my review of The Mysterious Howling and The Interrupted Tale. Apparently, I haven’t reviewed every installment of the series.)

In The Unmapped Sea, Lady Constance is expecting a baby. She cannot believe it and is overcome by how uncomfortable she is. The doctor orders a vacation by the sea. It is the middle of winter, so of course Lady Constance thinks they’re going to Italy.

Of course Lord Ashton is NOT going to Italy, what! Brighton is the place to be. Who cares if it’s January? It will be just fine. The rest of the household has its doubts, but they all proceed to Brighton – including our dauntless governess, Penelope Lumley, and her charges, Alexander, Beowulf and Cassiopeia Incorrigible.

There, Miss Lumley tries to solve the problem of the children’s origin – where did they come from? And why is someone trying to kill them? All while navigating new ‘friendships’ with the temperamental Russian family also vacationing in Brighton.

Which begs the question, why are the Babushkinov family there? And, indeed, why exactly are the Ashtons and Incorrigibles there?

The sinister answer reveals itself – and sets up the next book in the series – at the end of the book. I love these books, and I was shocked! horrified! weeping! for Miss Lumley and the Incorrigibles at the end.

(It’s really not that bad. But after having invested in reading the five books in this series, I was amazed at the direction Wood took to set up book six.)

I cannot say enough good about these books. I love them.

Highly recommended for ages 8 and up (audio book) and ages 12 and up (reading – mainly because of vocabulary level).

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